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June 19, 2012 3:04 am  #101


Re: Awkward words in the US

Sherli Bakerst wrote:

Having just watched the Pilot for the first time a couple days ago, I was struck by the sign on what became Speedy's.  In the pilot, it's Mrs. Hudson's Snax (or is it spelled snacks?) and Sarnies.  I had absolutely no idea what sarnies meant until I googled it.  I don't think that word for sandwich is used anywhere in the US.

Also, we don't use whilst at all; it's always while.

And Aussies call sandwiches "Sangas"

"I'll have a Vegemite Sanga thanks mum".


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Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
 

June 19, 2012 5:29 am  #102


Re: Awkward words in the US

Hey Kaz, that's just what I was gunna say, mate!

Something that intrigues me is the different way we write the date, e.g. today's date is 19.06.12, the day, month, year, which seems the logical way. I believe our Yank cousins write it month, day, year. Why is this so?


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June 19, 2012 6:32 am  #103


Re: Awkward words in the US

Yeah, the date thing has always puzzled me too. Go to USA and Canada and you have to think REALLY hard when filling in forms, especially those immigration entry things.


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June 19, 2012 6:35 am  #104


Re: Awkward words in the US

Vegemite: Ugh.

And in China, the date is written: year/month/day.  Which is actually the most logical if you think about it.


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June 19, 2012 11:14 am  #105


Re: Awkward words in the US

hepzibah wrote:

Something that intrigues me is the different way we write the date, e.g. today's date is 19.06.12, the day, month, year, which seems the logical way. I believe our Yank cousins write it month, day, year. Why is this so?

It's no more logical to day "it's the 19th of June, 2012" than it is to say "it's June 19, 2012."

And why do Americans use hyphens or slash marks when they write the date in numbers, ie, 6-19-12 or 6/19/12, while the UK (not sure about other countries) abbreviate it 19.6.12, with periods/decimal points? 

In both of those cases, it's just tradition, and I don't think "logic" has anything to do with it.

 

June 19, 2012 11:17 am  #106


Re: Awkward words in the US

Ahh see Down Under we just do any old symbol between the numbers.
We have more important things to think of, lol


____________________________________________________________________________________________
Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
 

June 19, 2012 11:45 am  #107


Re: Awkward words in the US

I must admit there's (at least) one thing where the americans have it more logically than us Finns. And that is the notes/chords in music. It's logical that you have them alphabetically A, B, C, C, E, F, G, right? Well, here B means Bb and we've added an H so it's A, H, C, D, E, F, G. I believe this is also in some other European countries but it just makes no sense. Rant over.


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June 19, 2012 4:23 pm  #108


Re: Awkward words in the US

Yeah, that is a bit weird...


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June 19, 2012 7:04 pm  #109


Re: Awkward words in the US

ancientsgate wrote:

hepzibah wrote:

Something that intrigues me is the different way we write the date, e.g. today's date is 19.06.12, the day, month, year, which seems the logical way. I believe our Yank cousins write it month, day, year. Why is this so?

It's no more logical to day "it's the 19th of June, 2012" than it is to say "it's June 19, 2012."

And why do Americans use hyphens or slash marks when they write the date in numbers, ie, 6-19-12 or 6/19/12, while the UK (not sure about other countries) abbreviate it 19.6.12, with periods/decimal points? 

In both of those cases, it's just tradition, and I don't think "logic" has anything to do with it.

In some cases in the US, it has become stylish to use dots (periods). I think it is a marketing attempt to look more modern and edgy in a techie sort of way.

 

June 19, 2012 7:06 pm  #110


Re: Awkward words in the US

kazza474 wrote:

Davina wrote:

We used to call fizzy drinks 'pop' but you don't often hear it in the UK now, well not in the areas I have visited, except for older people. They use 'pop' in Canada too. People here will generally always call colas 'Coke' regardless of the brand. 'Soda' is only used for soda water.

Oh we call coke, lemonade, etc etc all the same thing :
Soft Drink.

OK, anyone here would understand that, too. Not sure if we would expect it to be carbonated or not, but at least we'd know it wasn't hard (alcoholic).

 

July 21, 2012 10:11 am  #111


Re: Awkward words in the US

This is exactly what I am talking about earlier!


http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u204/bigshebanger/fannypack.png


____________________________________________________________________________________________
Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
 

July 25, 2012 11:02 am  #112


Re: Awkward words in the US

So in the Free Rants thread we have just had the American word 'suspenders' which we Brits call 'braces'. Suspenders are what ladies use to hold up stockings. Oo la la!

Last edited by Davina (July 25, 2012 11:06 am)


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July 25, 2012 5:40 pm  #113


Re: Awkward words in the US

Davina wrote:

So in the Free Rants thread we have just had the American word 'suspenders' which we Brits call 'braces'. Suspenders are what ladies use to hold up stockings. Oo la la!

Aha - what we call garters. Garters can also be the elastic kind that you roll the top of the stocking over.

So, my fellow Americans, if you do meet Benny, don't say you'd like to see him in suspenders (unless that is what you want).

 

July 25, 2012 9:53 pm  #114


Re: Awkward words in the US

We do have garters as well but they ae just around a single leg, right. They are rarely worn at all nowadays except when ladies get married when traditionally they wear a garter, often blue in colour. There is a tradition here to wear: something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue. Do you have any particular traditions in your countries folks?


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Don't make people into heroes John. Heroes don't exist and if they did I wouldn't be one of them.
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