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June 9, 2012 5:25 pm  #41


Re: Awkward words in the US

Showing my ignorance agian, but... What's a throw-out word?


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I was wondering if you'd like to have coffee...
Hmm. I really don't know. Oh, I'm sorry, did I say 'know'? I meant 'care'. I don't really care. 
Douglas Richardson, Cremona
 

June 9, 2012 5:26 pm  #42


Re: Awkward words in the US

Here's a favourite of mine from down under.




-m0r


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And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
 

June 9, 2012 5:33 pm  #43


Re: Awkward words in the US

Molly Hooper wrote:

Showing my ignorance agian, but... What's a throw-out word?

Oh, just something easily dismissed. Kinda like responding, "Whatever..." (Oh that reminds me, have you seen "We Bought A Zoo". Cute story.


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"Perfectly sound analysis. I was hoping you would go a little deeper."
 

June 9, 2012 5:40 pm  #44


Re: Awkward words in the US

No, I haven't, but I want to!
Is it relevant to 'Whatever' or Quavers?!


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I was wondering if you'd like to have coffee...
Hmm. I really don't know. Oh, I'm sorry, did I say 'know'? I meant 'care'. I don't really care. 
Douglas Richardson, Cremona
 

June 9, 2012 6:51 pm  #45


Re: Awkward words in the US

Whatever. (Not said dismissively, of course, but in answer to your query...) 


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"Perfectly sound analysis. I was hoping you would go a little deeper."
 

June 9, 2012 7:59 pm  #46


Re: Awkward words in the US

I do use a lot of 'Britishisms' when I speak, and even more when I write because when I was younger I spent all my time reading Harry Potter instead of talking to people!

I still always refer to cookies with tea as 'biscuits' and the mail as 'post'. I didn't realize this was strange until I was seven and said "should I get the post, mom?" and she freaked out!

Randy is one of the worst ones, because it's a name! My personal favorite Australianism (at least I think it's from Australia, correct me if I'm wrong, kazza) is "budgie smuggler"! My history teacher told us about that one last year and was really puzzled as to the origin. I did not explain it for him!

Plastered means the same thing as it does there.

Tantalus, I always thought that saying someone was being an ass or made an ass of himself was still fairly vulgar! Maybe it's different in the South? (no matter what the Brits say, we have much more linguistic variation in this country than they do in theirs!)


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Initials SH and proud owner of a viola named Watson.

Potential flatmates should know the worst about each other.

It's a three patch problem.

I didn't know; I saw.
 

June 9, 2012 8:11 pm  #47


Re: Awkward words in the US

Ooh, are you asking for a ... DEBATE?!


Smoggy_London_Air wrote:

I"should I get the post, mom?" and she freaked out!

At least you called her MOM (not MUM!)


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I was wondering if you'd like to have coffee...
Hmm. I really don't know. Oh, I'm sorry, did I say 'know'? I meant 'care'. I don't really care. 
Douglas Richardson, Cremona
 

June 9, 2012 11:33 pm  #48


Re: Awkward words in the US

http://www.thepunch.com.au/images/uploads/speedos-angelo-soulas-main.jpg


Budgie smugglers

http://coolcanucks.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/band-aid.jpg


Band Aids


____________________________________________________________________________________________
Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
 

June 10, 2012 1:52 am  #49


Re: Awkward words in the US

kazza474 wrote:

http://www.thepunch.com.au/images/uploads/speedos-angelo-soulas-main.jpg


Budgie smugglers

http://coolcanucks.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/band-aid.jpg


Band Aids

Thanks for the picture of Band-Aids. I wanted to post one but don't really know how.

So... budgie smugglers are what you call those smooth, round hand-rail thingies on ships. Right?


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"Perfectly sound analysis. I was hoping you would go a little deeper."
 

June 10, 2012 1:57 am  #50


Re: Awkward words in the US

Smoggy_London_Air wrote:

Tantalus, I always thought that saying someone was being an ass or made an ass of himself was still fairly vulgar! Maybe it's different in the South?

Maybe it is more common in the south, but I think it's more a time-period thing. Using ass in this way isn't as common now, but in the late 19th century in America, up until oh, the 50's or so, it was in pretty regular use, even around children, and in children's literature. I collect children's books from the turn-of-the-century, and they're pretty full of the expression.

Still, I could say, "He made quite an ass of himself," in front of the most prudish person down here, and not get more than a raised eyebrow at most.


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"Perfectly sound analysis. I was hoping you would go a little deeper."
 

June 10, 2012 1:21 pm  #51


Re: Awkward words in the US

Damn is definitely not regarded as swearing in the UK and although bloody is rude it is not regarded is rude a word as it once was. The other word for a cat is used as in the US but is also used to indicate that someone, usually male, is a coward/softie/wimp.

Arse is ruder than saying bottom but is just seen as coarse language rather than really swearing.

Also, why do North American stand in lines rather than queues?


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Don't make people into heroes John. Heroes don't exist and if they did I wouldn't be one of them.
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     Thread Starter
 

June 10, 2012 1:30 pm  #52


Re: Awkward words in the US

Yeah, and why do they say
'Thanks for the ride!' instead of
'Thanks for the lift!' ?


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I was wondering if you'd like to have coffee...
Hmm. I really don't know. Oh, I'm sorry, did I say 'know'? I meant 'care'. I don't really care. 
Douglas Richardson, Cremona
 

June 10, 2012 2:02 pm  #53


Re: Awkward words in the US

And why do they call lifts elevators?


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Don't make people into heroes John. Heroes don't exist and if they did I wouldn't be one of them.
http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mdq1pcLCUR1rs9hrro1_500.jpg
     Thread Starter
 

June 10, 2012 7:44 pm  #54


Re: Awkward words in the US

Hm. I can't really take part in that discussion, not being British or American.
BUT the topic is "Awkward words in the US", soooo... there are some words - called "false friends" - which can be confusing for Germans because they sound similiar to a German word but have a complete different meaning or something like that.
I guess the become/bekommen confusion is quite a famous one.
I don't really know good examples right now, but maybe... well "ankle" sounds quite the same as the German "Enkel"(=grandchild).

Oh, and what really confused not only me but probably a lot of others as well - public schools! Damn, the realization I had when I found out what a public school is in Britain... :D

 

June 11, 2012 4:24 pm  #55


Re: Awkward words in the US

Molly Hooper wrote:

Yeah, and why do they say
'Thanks for the ride!' instead of
'Thanks for the lift!' ?

Well, I could be biased (probably am), but "ride" seems to make more sense in this usage than "lift"...


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"Perfectly sound analysis. I was hoping you would go a little deeper."
 

June 11, 2012 5:08 pm  #56


Re: Awkward words in the US

Yeah, it does; i just wanted something to moan about!!


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I was wondering if you'd like to have coffee...
Hmm. I really don't know. Oh, I'm sorry, did I say 'know'? I meant 'care'. I don't really care. 
Douglas Richardson, Cremona
 

June 11, 2012 5:20 pm  #57


Re: Awkward words in the US

I don't know whether you guys know about this site:
http://www.effingpot.com
I bookmarked it ages ago and I'm having lots of fun reading it.


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John: "Have you spoken to Mycroft, Molly, uh, anyone?"
Mrs Hudson: "They don’t matter. You do."


I BELIEVE IN SERIES 5!
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June 11, 2012 5:30 pm  #58


Re: Awkward words in the US

Haha! That's brilliant! The name puts you off a bit though!


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I was wondering if you'd like to have coffee...
Hmm. I really don't know. Oh, I'm sorry, did I say 'know'? I meant 'care'. I don't really care. 
Douglas Richardson, Cremona
 

June 11, 2012 9:43 pm  #59


Re: Awkward words in the US

Sammy...what about Gift?
Oh and Mist?
And Lust!


Last edited by Davina (June 11, 2012 9:45 pm)


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Don't make people into heroes John. Heroes don't exist and if they did I wouldn't be one of them.
http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mdq1pcLCUR1rs9hrro1_500.jpg
     Thread Starter
 

June 11, 2012 10:04 pm  #60


Re: Awkward words in the US

UK==football
USA==Soccer.   


they both use the same ball--  round with black spots...so  why  is this?


UK--Skip 
USA--Dumpster 

Sherlock  said, "Took me less than an hour to find the right skip"

There's a Harry Potter Lexicon...it has a subsection called STRICTLY BRITISH   you  might find  some fun reading there.

Last edited by sherlockskitty (June 11, 2012 10:11 pm)


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