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March 25, 2012 5:47 am  #1


Den of Geek reviews

I enjoy reading these reviews, so I figured maybe we should collect them all here. Please feel free to collect and leave others in this thread. (I've read most so I'll have to back track now to find them)

This is one for The Great Game:
http://www.denofgeek.com/television/557954/sherlock_the_great_game_review.html

Good description of the show in this piece:
The Great Game wasn't an adventure just about the last ten minutes, and interestingly, it didn't follow the same formula as the two stories we've seen thus far. Whereas A Study In Pink and The Blind Banker have given us one case apiece to get our teeth into, here Holmes and Watson have to bash their way through several before they can get to the end of level boss. That means that Gatiss' script doesn't quite have the level of detail behind each individual case, as he instead leaves enough crumbs visible for Sherlock to do his work, but not too much on top.


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Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
 

March 25, 2012 5:54 am  #2


Re: Den of Geek reviews

http://www.denofgeek.com/television/552344/sherlock_the_blind_banker_review.html

Blind Banker review

Interesting look at things also:

The Blind Banker attempts to defrost Watson a little by focusing on him coming to terms with his post-army life. The most obvious manifestation of that is when he goes on a date, but predictably, that doesn't go quite to plan when Sherlock manages to gatecrash it. A thread has nonetheless been put in place that may be picked up on next week, as Watson very much remains a troubled man.

Sherlock himself meanwhile is still a relentless, chilly beast when he's in the midst of a murder case. Benedict Cumberbatch captures that terrifically well, and the desire for the writers to dig further into his character this early is tempered by the fact that he almost feels like the supporting act here. He's still the title character, but there's no desire to put him in as many scenes as possible, and if anything, it feels as if Thompson has chosen to pull back on deploying Sherlock too much, if anything. Watson is given his fair share of heavy lifting to do, instead.

Good on Stephen Thompson for this, too, because the mystery of the character of Sherlock is as compelling as the cases he's faced so far, for me.


Thompson held back on developing Sherlock's character more than the first show did. Is that maybe because he'd figured " It's Moftiss's character??? interesting.
Although really, was it necessary to develop it in this show?


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Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
     Thread Starter
 

March 25, 2012 7:56 am  #3


Re: Den of Geek reviews

http://www.denofgeek.com/television/547082/sherlock_a_study_in_pink_review.html

Study in Pink review

Good mention of Paul McGuigan here too!


However, before I get to the character of Sherlock himself, it’d be wrong not to acknowledge just how the opening scenes also highlight very quickly just how tight Paul McGuigan’s direction is.

McGuigan, whose background is movies such as Gangster Number One and Lucky Number Slevin, is a brilliant, brilliant choice here. Throughout A Study In Pink, his camerawork is unfussy, and he applies a filmic version of the laws of thirds to many of his frames. It’s to great effect, too.

Furthermore, come the big climactic scene, he’s happy to ground his camera, eschewing close-ups in favour of having two actors talk to each other. It’s at the point where Sherlock confronts his nemesis face to face that McGuigan’s camera moves the least. Granted, the quality of the written material enables him to do this, but he wisely figures that we’re interested in seeing the story being told, rather than any distracting gimmickry. As such, McGuigan’s steady hand is very welcome, indeed.

He also employs some terrific little techniques, specifically the text messages appearing on screen, which we first see during the aforementioned press conference scene. This too could have been a gimmick in the wrong hands, but it’s used sparingly, and to give the audience pieces of important information. I really liked the way he staged the foot-chase after the cab, too, taking advantage of Mr Holmes' inner-satnav.


____________________________________________________________________________________________
Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
     Thread Starter
 

March 25, 2012 8:01 am  #4


Re: Den of Geek reviews

And here's an article on Series 03

http://www.denofgeek.com/television/1291241/sherlock_series_3_planned_out.html

Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss have the third series of Sherlock mapped out. Now? There’s just the small matter of writing it…

Published on Mar 21, 2012



SO!
They already have it worked out huh?
Time to watch every "t" they cross and every "I" they dot! lmaooo.


____________________________________________________________________________________________
Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
     Thread Starter
 

March 25, 2012 8:09 am  #5


Re: Den of Geek reviews

What villains can we expect in Sherlock series 3?

http://www.denofgeek.com/television/1281366/what_villains_can_we_expect_in_sherlock_series_3.html

It lifts my heart to see them mention my fave idea for a future villain!

Not all of Sherlock’s antagonists are murderers or fraudsters. One story that positively cries out for a modern reworking is The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton. The slimy individual of the title is a professional blackmailer, profiting from the secrets of the rich and famous. Holmes manages to embed himself in Milverton’s household at the behest of a wealthy and desperate client, only to find that another of Milverton’s victims has a rather more permanent method of silencing the villain. The concept of the heartless blackmailer and his misdeeds recast within a new, modern world of 24-hour celebrity culture is appealing. After Sherlock’s brief foray into that environment during The Great Game, the prospect of more fish-out-of-water shenanigans makes this one a good bet.


____________________________________________________________________________________________
Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
     Thread Starter
 

March 25, 2012 9:24 am  #6


Re: Den of Geek reviews

Haven't read the Milverton story yet but isn't the idea of blackmailing celebrities kind of similar to Irene Adler having incriminating pics of a member of the Royal Family? It would have to be done completely differently.

Interesting review though!


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March 25, 2012 9:35 am  #7


Re: Den of Geek reviews

Sort of, I have posted about it before.
This guy wasn't targeting 'celebs' in so much as just affluent women. He did it over a 12 year span, and Holmes absolutely HATED this guy. He was one of the few villains that really made him angry.
In the original, the victim kills the villain and Sherlock & Watson witness this, but they do nothing as far as reporting it.
They ensured  no evidence was around and slipped away straight afterwards, the police had a vague description of the 2 men seen running from the place but no-one was ever caught.

I can see a lot of potentials in the story.


____________________________________________________________________________________________
Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
     Thread Starter
 

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