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January 6, 2013 10:28 pm  #41


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

Such churchyards are very common here. A family burial plot would be quite likely for them.


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Don't make people into heroes John. Heroes don't exist and if they did I wouldn't be one of them.
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January 7, 2013 6:54 am  #42


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

See I'd always taken this as a sign that this wasn't Sherlock's real grave.
Apart from the lack of dates and details on the headstone.
I am fairly certain there will somewhere be a very grand Holmes family tomb.  Then again, Sherlock could have left specific instructions that he was not to be buried there.
But do we think Sherlock will have left death instructions?  I doubt it, I rather think he couldn't care what happens when he's dead.
But, a couple of points of clarity, too.
There are in Britain(presumably Ireland, too actually) traditional churches with the graveyard attache/next to them.
More commonly I would say, you get separate cemeteries.  More posh/traditional ones may have a chapel type building there.  But they are often just a piece of land.

Last edited by besleybean (January 7, 2013 6:55 am)


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January 7, 2013 1:18 pm  #43


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

besleybean wrote:

See I'd always taken this as a sign that this wasn't Sherlock's real grave.
Apart from the lack of dates and details on the headstone.
I am fairly certain there will somewhere be a very grand Holmes family tomb.  Then again, Sherlock could have left specific instructions that he was not to be buried there.
But do we think Sherlock will have left death instructions?  I doubt it, I rather think he couldn't care what happens when he's dead.
But, a couple of points of clarity, too.
There are in Britain(presumably Ireland, too actually) traditional churches with the graveyard attache/next to them.
More commonly I would say, you get separate cemeteries.  More posh/traditional ones may have a chapel type building there.  But they are often just a piece of land.

I think we've think that perhaps we've found 'the big OOC' moment in bbc Sherlock. A man who doesn't believe in heaven getting a traditional burial.


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January 7, 2013 2:01 pm  #44


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

Well I have been poking around doing some reading on this matter; there are plenty of pages around with varying degrees of speculation.
I have however found one that seems to ring with just the facts and a fairly decent summary:

The Religious Opinions of Sherlock Holmes.

Also worthy of note, showing not only his references to religion, but also to other subjects and thus giving us a comparison of how he really just has an interest in a great many things.
Sherlock Holmes on Religion

It took me ages to post this because as usual, there were so many interesting tangents to travel down, lol.


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Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
 

January 7, 2013 2:12 pm  #45


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

Thanks for posting, Kazza, these are really interesting. 


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"To fake the death of one sibling may be regarded as a misfortune; to fake the death of both looks like carelessness." Oscar Wilde about Mycroft Holmes

"It is what it is says love." (Erich Fried)

“Enjoy the journey of life and not just the endgame. I’m also a great believer in treating others as you would like to be treated.” (Benedict Cumberbatch)

http://up.picr.de/28609194so.png

 
 

January 7, 2013 3:55 pm  #46


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

Thanks for posting these articles Kazza. Both very interesting.


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Don't make people into heroes John. Heroes don't exist and if they did I wouldn't be one of them.
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January 7, 2013 3:58 pm  #47


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

You're welcome. The second link in one place I like poking around in.


____________________________________________________________________________________________
Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
 

January 7, 2013 4:03 pm  #48


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

Oh, there's stuff on Lord Peter Wimsey, too. That's great, one of my favourites. 


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"To fake the death of one sibling may be regarded as a misfortune; to fake the death of both looks like carelessness." Oscar Wilde about Mycroft Holmes

"It is what it is says love." (Erich Fried)

“Enjoy the journey of life and not just the endgame. I’m also a great believer in treating others as you would like to be treated.” (Benedict Cumberbatch)

http://up.picr.de/28609194so.png

 
 

January 7, 2013 6:56 pm  #49


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

And anyway, isn't Moriarty in Sherlock's grave?  That's what I always assumed.


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January 7, 2013 7:50 pm  #50


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

Mnemosyne wrote:

.....I think we've think that perhaps we've found 'the big OOC' moment in bbc Sherlock. A man who doesn't believe in heaven getting a traditional burial.

When we die, our families get to decide where we go, regardless of any "character" we had in life. So if anyone cares, they better make some airtight legal arrangements for their own physical disposal after death. Even then, from what I hear, the family's wishes trumps most everything else.

 

January 7, 2013 7:54 pm  #51


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

besleybean wrote:

And anyway, isn't Moriarty in Sherlock's grave?  That's what I always assumed.

The actual show was completely silent about Moriarty's disposal. We saw him looking dead on the rooftop, and then they never showed him or referenced him again. I'm assuming episode 3.1 will deal with this. No reason why anyone has to be in S's grave--  all they needed to do was fill 2 or 3 large bags with sand to weigh down the coffin, and no one handling the thing in the hearse or during the actual burial would have questioned anything.

 

January 8, 2013 5:21 pm  #52


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

As to Sherlock Holmes' religious views, I have a question

In 'Gloria Scott', Holmes first case, and set in his college days, he recounts of how  his friend Victor Trevor's " bull terrier freezing on to my ankle one morning as I went down to chapel."

Does this imply that he was religious at that time or is it to be taken just as a common practice to go to chapel?


 
 

January 8, 2013 6:34 pm  #53


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

I think a bit of both for Sherlock Holmes in the original stories.
I think not for BBC Sherlock,.


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January 9, 2013 3:40 am  #54


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

Thanks. I would like him to be an agnostic. That makes sense


 
 

February 13, 2013 12:38 pm  #55


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

I would like to ask a question about something I habe observerd in Sherlock's behaviour with his right hand. It happened the first time in the beginning of Hounds when he twists his fingers. I would like to know weather it is just a nervous tick or it is something meaningfull.
I think it is the latter. He does it several times just for a few seconds.  Any ideas?

 

February 14, 2013 1:58 pm  #56


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

I will need to rewatch the episode to see exactly what you mean. It could just be, as I suspect, a random mannerism. But let's say it were significant, in what way do you think it could be? Any thoughts on what it could mean?


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'Non Solum Ingenii Verum Etiam Virtutis'
                
 

February 14, 2013 11:02 pm  #57


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

Be wrote:

I would like to ask a question about something I habe observerd in Sherlock's behaviour with his right hand. It happened the first time in the beginning of Hounds when he twists his fingers. I would like to know weather it is just a nervous tick or it is something meaningfull.
I think it is the latter. He does it several times just for a few seconds.  Any ideas?

I realized it for the first time in TRF, the scene after the taxi drive with Moriarty, after that assassin was killed. A nightmare scene to me, and I always interpreted that movement with his little finger as a kind of tension, nervosity and concentrated thinking. Something showing Sherlock´s under pressure. Later I realized it in the beginning of THoB, and now I am not so sure about my interpretation. Definetely Sherlock is bored here in that scene, no need for concentrated thinking under pressure.
But however it can be interpreted, I am sure it means something. At least to BC, who has not optionally chosen that movement in his role for several scenes to express something. So, where is the common denominator of both scenes?

Last edited by anjaH_alias (February 14, 2013 11:04 pm)

 

February 15, 2013 9:36 am  #58


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

These movements with his fingers are new since The Hounds. I think we haven't seen him do it in series1.
Maybe it is meant to express boredom. But then Sherlock even does it in the confrontation scene in Kitty's flat when he is listening to John, Richard and Kitty revealing Sherlock is a fraud. If he is bored now, it means that Sherlock knew exactly what would happen next.
On the other hand it is done while waiting or doing nothing of importance:
Watching the TV scene at the beginning of The Hounds when we see him form behind twisting very fast with his fingers.
Waiting in front of the interrogation room before they are allowed to talk to the girl in TRF.
It could be his way of trying to express impatience: He wants things to go on quickly because it is like a script or film in his head that has to play forward. If you know how people think and act in advance you get impatient waiting for the interesting part to come.

 

February 21, 2013 12:22 am  #59


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

I think that movement suggests stress and tension.
In TRF it's obvious why he is stressed, whereas in HoB it doesn't seem that obvious first because the main emotion in this scene for Sherlock seems to be boredom. But we have to keep in mind that he is suffering from nicotine withdrawal, so he's pretty agitated in that moment.


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February 21, 2013 8:56 am  #60


Re: An analysis on Sherlock

Lily wrote:

I think that movement suggests stress and tension.
In TRF it's obvious why he is stressed, whereas in HoB it doesn't seem that obvious first because the main emotion in this scene for Sherlock seems to be boredom. But we have to keep in mind that he is suffering from nicotine withdrawal, so he's pretty agitated in that moment.

That´s a good point, I agree with you. And also boredom causes a kind of stress to him .

 

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