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July 4, 2012 3:47 am  #1


American Presidential Elections

Anyone on this forum voting in them?

Anyone loath to vote? Horrified by the candidates' antics? Turning a blind eye to everything that's going on because you don't want to see anymore? Hoping one candidate or the other (or both of them) is as fake as Richard Brook?

Discuss here. Non-Americans are free to post their take if they wish.


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Initials SH and proud owner of a viola named Watson.

Potential flatmates should know the worst about each other.

It's a three patch problem.

I didn't know; I saw.
 

July 5, 2012 6:57 pm  #2


Re: American Presidential Elections

"We have met the enemy, and he is us..."


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"Perfectly sound analysis. I was hoping you would go a little deeper."
 

July 5, 2012 7:27 pm  #3


Re: American Presidential Elections

LOL at Tantalus.

I'm voting. Will choose Obama although I'm not thrilled with him. Guess expecting to be thrilled by politicians might be asking a bit much.

I'm not horrified by the candidates so much as the incredible influence of money in our political system and the distorting effect it has on our politics. Not so much in the presidential race, actually... it's more insidious at lower levels.

Any candidate or party that credibly promised to move to publicly funded elections would have my vote in a heartbeat. That way the politicians could stop trying to please the deep pockets, wealthy businessmen like the Kochs on one side or the labor unions on the other, and start actually doing the work of governing. They'd have to get something done, because it'd be the only way to win votes.

 

July 5, 2012 8:25 pm  #4


Re: American Presidential Elections

I am most certainly voting. Though I agree with imane nikko, the system has become corrupt. I would strongly prefer the US to switch to a multi- party system and to adopt publicly funded elections. Once a vote of an individual is minimized, it's not a Democracy anymore.
Oh yes- also - and I don't know how to achieve it- there must be much better awareness of political process from general public.

Last edited by deerstalker (July 5, 2012 8:29 pm)

 

July 5, 2012 11:05 pm  #5


Re: American Presidential Elections

I agree. We need more political parties in the US, and it needs to be less corrupt. And people need to actually know about the candidates and system. If people are just going to vote along party lines, nothing's going to change.

 

July 6, 2012 12:17 am  #6


Re: American Presidential Elections

I am voting for Obama and all the other Democrats.


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Disguise is always a self portrait
 

July 6, 2012 6:35 am  #7


Re: American Presidential Elections

Well, in Germany there is quite a lot of coverage on the presidential elections, especially during the Republican search for a candidate (sorry, I know there's a word for it, but I must have deleted it). Over here such decisions are taken exclusively by the parties themselves, the public is not involved. I know that there a strong sympathies for President Obama because he may in some aspects be closer to European thinking than the Republicans. For example the concept of a compulsive  health insurance simply belongs to our political system and therefore it is difficult to understand how this can be regarded as a threat to personal freedom. There is also the matter of financing the campaigns which is done differently over here - I'm not saying better because I would never criticise another democratic system just because it's different from my own. Another thing that is sometimes difficult for me to understand is the strong connection between religion and politics in the US or a thing like the Tea Party movement, but of course both are rooted in American history and are therefore an element of your culture.
Regarding a multi-party system: I think it does have its advantages and disadvantages. Usually you have to make coalitions in order to govern, so there will be compromises. The power of the individual party is reduced. In Germany we have a 5-percent-clause, i.e. a party must win at least 5 % of the votes in order to get into parliament. This shall prevent the country becoming ungovernable because there are too many parties, a thing that happened in the 1920s before Hitler's rise to power. But in general it's good to have more parties. A new party always means a challenge to the traditional parties and may force them to change their set structures. This was the case when the Green party with its strong focus on environmental protection was founded in 1980, later again with the Left Party and now with the internet based Pirate Party.
So, this was my little trip into politics for this morning. Hope I haven't proved too ignorant regarding your country  .


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"To fake the death of one sibling may be regarded as a misfortune; to fake the death of both looks like carelessness." Oscar Wilde about Mycroft Holmes

"It is what it is says love." (Erich Fried)

“Enjoy the journey of life and not just the endgame. I’m also a great believer in treating others as you would like to be treated.” (Benedict Cumberbatch)

http://up.picr.de/28609194so.png

 
 

July 8, 2012 3:59 am  #8


Re: American Presidential Elections

Nope, you're not ignorant. It's nice to see the European point of view. As to the health care debate, I've been laughing the whole time, especially at the people who say things like "Now that Obamacare has passed, I'm moving to Europe/Canada." Well, good luck with that.

As for the parties, I'm impartial about a multi-party system. There are advantages and disadvantages to any system, and George Washington disliked entire idea of political parties.

One day when I was in the courthouse (not on trial, ha ha, it was for a Mock Trial competition) I walked outside to see two feuding camps of protesters, half of them Tea Party, half of them "other", carrying signs that were at complete odds with each other. I thought it was kind of funny but at the same time it represents the kind of deadlock that has existed in Congress for years now. No one can agree, so not much happens.


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Initials SH and proud owner of a viola named Watson.

Potential flatmates should know the worst about each other.

It's a three patch problem.

I didn't know; I saw.
     Thread Starter
 

July 8, 2012 4:40 pm  #9


Re: American Presidential Elections

The whole Congress thing is getting rather annoying...

Theoretically, I agree with Washington. It would be better to not have any political parties, but I doubt that's going to happen anytime soon.

 

July 21, 2012 11:58 pm  #10


Re: American Presidential Elections

I live in the USA  and I'm not voting.   Why?   Because.   What have the presidents ever done for us poor people?  They've cut off the dental and vision part of our insurance.  I  can only  get new hearing aids every 5 years.   The only president I really liked  was JFK  and Ronald Reagan.  (I  think because they both had a certain  aura around them)  Plus...I'm  not really  into politics.


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SHERLOCK!!!!!!
 

July 22, 2012 1:21 pm  #11


Re: American Presidential Elections

Kitty, Kitty, Kitty, voting is a right and a priviledge. Please reconsider your decision. Politicians basically run our lives, so we MUST have a say in how they do it. If you don't like the main parties, look at the independents or smaller parties. At the moment in Australia the balance of power is held by 3 independents and the Greens party. They have power out of all proportion to their followers. Voting in Australia is compulsory and you get fined if you don't vote, so we have to take it seriously to make informed choices. I actually handed out how-to-vote cards in a federal election a few years ago and my party not only managed to defeat the existing government, but the Prime Minister, who I despised, actually lost his seat. Best day of my life.
It just takes a lot of us so-called little people to bring about change.

And I admire President Obama so much for what he has done to reform the health system in America. When I had a major operation followed by chemotherapy about 8 years ago, it cost me LESS than one thousand dollars. We pay a tiny percentage of our income into a government medical fund, and most of our medical expenses are paid for out of that. And the unemployed and pensioners pay nothing for medical care. Seems like something Americans need to consider.


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I wish the real world would just stop hassling me - Rob Thomas

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#destroythejoint
 

July 22, 2012 5:44 pm  #12


Re: American Presidential Elections

You're right hepzibbah  I never thot of it like that.  we don't get fined for not voting--I  never knew that about your country.  Perhaps I will change my  opinion  on  voting.   Thanks for your advice.


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SHERLOCK!!!!!!
 

July 22, 2012 7:06 pm  #13


Re: American Presidential Elections

We don't get fined for not voting in the UK either. Polls are rarely above about 40% of the population and are often below that. The right to vote is taken for granted rather than valued.


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Don't make people into heroes John. Heroes don't exist and if they did I wouldn't be one of them.
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July 22, 2012 7:21 pm  #14


Re: American Presidential Elections

Making voting compulsory means that even people who aren't interested in politics have to think about it for at least one day.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compulsory_voting

And did you know that Australia was the second country, after New Zealand, to give women the vote, and was the first country to allow women to stand for Parliament.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_and_government_in_Australia

There will be a test later 


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FREE PUSSY RIOT

I wish the real world would just stop hassling me - Rob Thomas

Did I mention that I have a Kindle?

#destroythejoint
 

July 23, 2012 12:30 pm  #15


Re: American Presidential Elections

I won't talk politics, but there is an interesting point illustrated in here:


imane nikko wrote:

I'm not horrified by the candidates so much as the incredible influence of money in our political system and the distorting effect it has on our politics. Not so much in the presidential race, actually... it's more insidious at lower levels.

Any candidate or party that credibly promised to move to publicly funded elections would have my vote in a heartbeat. That way the politicians could stop trying to please the deep pockets, wealthy businessmen like the Kochs on one side or the labor unions on the other, and start actually doing the work of governing. They'd have to get something done, because it'd be the only way to win votes.

sherlockskitty wrote:

I live in the USA  and I'm not voting.   Why?   Because.   What have the presidents ever done for us poor people?  They've cut off the dental and vision part of our insurance.....

Only when the 'little people' all start speaking up & having their say at elections, will the money effect be partially neutralised. It will never go away, but 'the little people' cannot be bought. No amount of money will compensate for knowing that the elderly will not suffer in pain because they cannot afford care.

Sure, they will be swayed by promises & short term handouts, but the working classes have very long memories & within a decade of EVERYONE having their say, things will abate.
Australia is NOT a poor country, yet money does not hold a great deal of political power here.
So skitty, if you want things to change, get everyone you know to start voting wisely.
Imane, if you want change away from the evils of money, get everyone you know to start voting wisely.

Funny how 2 completely different posts have the same solution.
Damned good analysis if I say so myself.


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Also, please note that sentences can also end in full stops. The exclamation mark can be overused.
Sherlock Holmes 28 March 13:08

Mycroft’s popularity doesn’t surprise me at all. He is, after all, incredibly beautiful, clever and well-dressed. And beautiful. Did I mention that?
--Mark Gatiss

"I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."
Robert McCloskey
 

July 24, 2012 9:49 am  #16


Re: American Presidential Elections

If you become interested in politics, this could happen to you

http://i1057.photobucket.com/albums/t387/hepzibah59/b27e1fd6d52a11e1ad8e22000a1e88a7_7.jpg


http://i1057.photobucket.com/albums/t387/hepzibah59/1fcaaed4d52a11e192ea12313b06ea11_7.jpg


Australia's Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, on the set of Hugh Jackman's new movie The Wolverine, which is being filmed in Australia.

Last edited by hepzibah (July 24, 2012 9:53 am)


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FREE PUSSY RIOT

I wish the real world would just stop hassling me - Rob Thomas

Did I mention that I have a Kindle?

#destroythejoint
 

September 13, 2012 8:34 pm  #17


Re: American Presidential Elections

Voting for sure. I voted for Obama in '08, but being mainly Libertarian/Independent this is the first time I will vote a straight Democratic ticket because I can't imagine a world where the Romney's get to live in the White House. I have some very strong language coming to mind, so I'll just leave it at that. 


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In a world of locked rooms, the man with the key is king. And honey...you should see me in a crown...
 

September 14, 2012 3:34 am  #18


Re: American Presidential Elections

I have never been too interested in crime scenes after seeing some, and am instead following Mycroft's footsteps with a fond interest in politics. And wonder if that is as close as to living Sherlock as it gets:

Engagement in politics is exceptional, disruptive, antagonistic, risky and dangerous.. it is work, onerous, dangerous work" (Barney 2010).

Sounds familiar?

Last edited by The Doctor (September 14, 2012 3:36 am)

 

October 7, 2012 2:00 am  #19


Re: American Presidential Elections

I'm voting! I'm voting for Obama. I agree with his views, he's intelligent, and while he hasn't ended all of the world's suffering over the past few years, if you look at the facts he has done a LOT. Plus, Romney? I think not. Ever. Even if I was Republican. I am, however, a bit disappointed about how the first debate went.


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“The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved,
desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn!" - Jack Kerouac
 

October 10, 2012 8:37 am  #20


Re: American Presidential Elections

Hello all,

I am a Canadian living in the us.   Its nice to see different people from different countries comparing the elections here.    As an ex-muslim I see the need to separate religion from politics simply because of my personal experience and upbringing.    If I did have the vote I certainly would not vote for a party that is willing to hold everyone else hostage to their own particular religious beliefs.

I could go on, but honestly all you have to do is pay attention.   There really isnt a choice!  I just wish the media would hold politicians to the bs they say and ask the really hard questions.   The last debate was all generalities and its easy to lie with generalities.  The devil is in the details!


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Come On Jan already!
 

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