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Martin Freeman » Favourite Martin pics » January 24, 2017 7:56 am

WhoIWantToBe
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nakahara wrote:

http://68.media.tumblr.com/b7d29d28a988f77653afd2b9c6453c39/tumblr_oj4jnfcM671qewsw4o2_500.gif

Creepin' my way in to say how much I love Freeman's hair poofy in this series. I ADORE the hairstyles men wore in to 20's (Google images for 1920's hair p0rn) and something about how it flops in his face is so nostalgic, classically handsome, I just adore it. 

General Sherlock Discussion » The comprehensive Johnlock guide (Johnlockers only) » January 24, 2017 7:42 am

WhoIWantToBe
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I agree, SusiGo, it is compelling because also the "if I am gone", implies that yes, they could only become this 'whatever it is' if she is gone. How come they couldn't be this way with her there? Hmmm, seems telling. She also describes them they way people who are shallow, or on the outside see them, it feels like she is being deliberately flippant. I think it was interesting back in ASiB, when Adler says they are a 'couple', even then, and they are even more in tune with each other now.

The Final Problem » Compilation of Canonical References in "The Final Problem" » January 24, 2017 7:28 am

The 'final court of appeal' lines in the original text is something I just loved growing up about Holmes. I love the idea that when everything else fails, the desperate go to 221B Baker St and Holmes looks at the case with an objective eye. I wish it hadn't been Mary who narrated that bit though in the series, would have preferredJohn himself or even Lestrade but am just happy it was included. 

The Final Problem » "I love you": a man's perspective - oh, just read it... :D » January 24, 2017 7:08 am

WhoIWantToBe
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ugh I hate these 'from a man's perspective' type posts, because honestly it just feels like 'a man said it, therefore its more valid'. I know that even if this is unintentional, it is often meant this way, because surely only a man knows what a man is thinking, amirite or what? *rolls eyes* 

I have no doubt that hurting Molly, or I should emphasize being MADE to hurt Molly is what drove Sherlock to act out. Mycroft says immediately after "Sherlock, however hard that was ..." and Sherlock doesn't let him finish the sentence. So, what was Mycroft going to say next? 

I sincerley doubt Sherlock ever harboured romantic feelings for Molly. When Molly says her and her fiance are having 'quite a lot of sex' in TSoT, Sherlock is about as creeped out as when Mrs Hudson admits to using his handcuffs in TLD  http://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons/shocked.png
  Since he came from his 'suicide', he had treated her fairly kindly, and I think more than anything was upset that Eurus makes him un-do all the damage he'd been trying to repair since. I think its pretty clear he adores Molly, but probably it is true that he has to be in a life or death situation before he'd ever admit his affection (romatoc or no), hence why Mycroft says "Sherlock, however hard that was ..."

General Sherlock Discussion » The comprehensive Johnlock guide (Johnlockers only) » January 24, 2017 6:38 am

WhoIWantToBe
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Schmiezi, I don't usually take sides on the relationships. But TFP has me undeniably seeing two men as a couple, who are emotionally but probably not physically intimate. Sherlock himself says John is family, and they function on the same wavelength throughout the entire episode, more than in any previous episode of any series. I am of the theory that most relationships are sadly categorized into only a few very small labels, when in fact most relationships change rapidly from one type to another in its evolution. I think for me, the important thing is I can't see them not functioning as a team from this point forward, and I really like the evidence that they will stick together like glue from now on. 

The Final Problem » A VERY interesting reference » January 20, 2017 10:01 pm

Really? OK that is fun, was this teh original fans, or recent BBC Sherlock fans?

The Final Problem » Horror movies referenced » January 19, 2017 1:40 am

WhoIWantToBe
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rlogcabin83 wrote:

To continue attacking the deceased equine

Just popping by to say that is hilarious, thank you  http://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons/lol.png


I really enjoyed the observations you mentioned, would relaly like to believe the writers went this deep.

The Final Problem » Not a fan of this episode » January 17, 2017 9:13 am

WhoIWantToBe
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Hah! nakahara and SolarSystem, good points! (I want to watch that BTS video now)

I just love the scene of the parents in 221B in TEH, rambling about spectacles when John arrives, and Sherlock gets all embarassed and kicks them out like a teenager. John states what I had thought at that moment 'but they are so normal'. I LOVE the idea that two normal parents could raise such genius, yet emotionally-constipated boys. It was so refreshing! 

I think I need some brain bleach so I can purge S4's reveal and go back to my happy place in S3, watching Sherlock slam the door on his mother's foot.... Just like I did as a youth

The Final Problem » Not a fan of this episode » January 17, 2017 8:32 am

WhoIWantToBe
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I have this crack theory that not only was the secret sibling not planned, the writers thought it was a good idea to introduce one after fans misinterpreted "Don't be absurd, I am not given to outbursts of brotherly compassion. You know what happened to the other one" . My crack/joke theory has Mycroft's really meaning 'you know what happened to my previous outburst of brotherly compassion', aka swooping in the get Sherlock out of Serbian jail, but prolonging it so he could watch his arse get kicked   

The Final Problem » The Final Problem: First impressions » January 17, 2017 7:29 am

WhoIWantToBe
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besleybean wrote:

Molly is called in to babysit.

Well in that case I hope they pay Molly handsomely, she is rather over qualified for that line work http://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons/lol.png

The Final Problem » Still unexplained secrets? » January 17, 2017 7:25 am

WhoIWantToBe
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My reading on this is all about Sherlock's reply of "well, now you do". That is a pretty sarcastic comment, and I took it as such in this context. It is super surprising that John doesn't know after all this time, funerals and weddings when Sherlock's actual day of birth is, and given that Sherlock never freely offers anything about himself without being prompted I don't think he deliberately hid it. A lot of people, especially as we get older, don't bother to learn my birthday including really close friends, and we don't really want to celebrate them either haha. The celebration of it is kind of reserved for a social occasion in our youth, so from experience something tells me this scene was written for Sherlock to be a bit unwanting of the attention, and then John changed his plans to include Molly and Sherlock in the outing for cake  :D  

The Final Problem » The Final Problem: First impressions » January 17, 2017 4:18 am

WhoIWantToBe
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oldechick wrote:

Wow, it took me all day at work to read the posts here! I'd sneak a pageful when I had the chance & drove myself crazy not being able to write in.
... But why ruin such good fun? I just feel there is a particular segment of fans who would settle for nothing less than Sherlock & John shagging in front of the Baker Street fireplace & walking hand-in-hand to Harrod's to register for wedding gifts! While that makes for some darn entertaining fanfic, it's not good drama or the vision the writers had.

I'm not following, where was this stated by anyone in this thread? That's a bit.... excessive. ಠ_ಠ

The Final Problem » A VERY interesting reference » January 17, 2017 3:17 am

OK, I promised I would not analyse this episode. My partner had other ideas- and I watched it again. I caught this:

https://s24.postimg.org/thyd9ctit/eight.jpg


That is Katherine Neville's The Eight, from 1988 on the floor at the very beginning of the 221B cleanup montage. It is in fact, the very first shot we see in this sequence- and placed very deliberately. Sherlock's hand appears and picks up the magnifying glass, which is right behind the book. 

What is significant about "The Eight"? Well, it about the quest for a legendary chess set, through different timestreams. The story is full of codes and encypted messages. 

"What makes The Eight an extraordinary novel, then, is its capacity to combine fiction with documented historical elements, and fit them into a narrative full of connections between such diverse subjects as music, art, history, mythology, physics, chemistry, mathematics, philosophy and, in more speculative fields, mysticism, metaphysics and alchemy, among other esoteric traditions. Despite telling the story of the imaginary search for an imaginary object by a group of imaginary characters and, despite the fact that its narrative is centered on an element of fantastic properties, the reading of The Eight oozes narrative realism, especially in its first two thirds. The reason for that, aside from these historical characters and this chess-related framework, which we’ll soon analyze, is the the careful spatial and temporal composition of the novel."

http://www.katherineneville.com/about-my-work/my-bookessays/1581-2/

Also, Chapter 13 features a Sherlock Holmes quote: “I play the game for the game’s own sake”. 

Clearly, its placement is intentional, meant to be noticed, but what do you make of it? 'Poetry, or truth'? 

 

The Final Problem » Horror movies referenced » January 17, 2017 12:28 am

WhoIWantToBe
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The Christmas present Eurus / Moriarty scene where they have 'glass sex' reminded me of this horror scene from "Alien: Resurrection":

https://s27.postimg.org/l9ud93feb/7o_OIMr_T.gif
image url upload

http://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons/devious.png

The Final Problem » Mycroft in TFP » January 16, 2017 11:46 pm

WhoIWantToBe
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meowraahsan wrote:

6. Mycroft's general reaction towards the atrocities that Euros was committing before his very eyes. He seemed to be the most human of the 3 (him, Sherlock and John), but that's plainly because he isn't as experienced as Sherlock and John when it comes to handling such high pressure situations. Sherlock and John clearly have nerves of absolute steel; true heroes. Mycroft was visibly disturbed by what was happening to them and even gagged when the governor shot himself. This is a side of M. Holmes we haven't seen before - a very vulnerable and horrified Mycroft Holmes. Phenomenal acting from Mark's part.

Although I largely did not like the episode, I sincerely liked this. I always felt Mycroft was pretty detached to what Sherlock and John did, his feelings towards 'legwork' were pretty indicative. So given Sherlock and John have a load of experience with this grisly, high pressure stuff, Mycroft certainly has his own situations but its pretty clear he is never on the front lines. I think he has a whole new respect for what Sherlock and John really do. 
 

The Final Problem » Questions about TFP » January 16, 2017 11:37 pm

WhoIWantToBe
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Liberty wrote:

When Sherlock seems to be about to kill himself with the gun, do you think he intended to do it, or do you think he had worked out that Eurus wouldn't let him?  

I think, given his dialogue about suicide in TLD, he would not have killed himself and banked on Eurus changing the game. He seemed to come to such a powerful conclusion in TLD on how death impacts those around you, and I'd like to think the character would not disregard that development. Then again, I am not too sure based on the loose threads of S4... 

The Final Problem » Not a fan of this episode » January 16, 2017 11:25 pm

WhoIWantToBe
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SolarSystem wrote:

... said that the success of the show has made Mofftiss kind of high and that the most important thing for them seems to be to throw all sorts of clever stuff at us - and most of the stuff doesn't really add up. And I agree. Everything has to be so clever - which is totally fine, but instead of just showing it to us they are making a huge fuss about it in advance, telling us how clever and crazy it's going to be.
 

Yeah, then they have the nerve to get angry at their fans for searching for clues, apparently! Come on Moffatt and Gatiss, you can't have it both ways. 

The Final Problem » TFP- Favourite scenes (photos/gifs) » January 16, 2017 12:35 pm

WhoIWantToBe
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I did love how he had this Avengers type weapon this whole time, and then gets weak in the knees when actually confronted woth violence! THAT was a good scene. 

The Final Problem » Not a fan of this episode » January 16, 2017 12:17 pm

WhoIWantToBe
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Whisky wrote:

I wonder, is there an objective way to judge this show?

 

It's art! It is super hard to be objective about art, I think if people were only feeling objectively about an art form, the creators would feel pretty dead inside    I remember once having to completely take apart a certain TV show in the cutting room, because the director themself had become so attached to the material. It was one of the hardest things I ever had to do, and some. I'd like to think in the end it was better, because I was more subjective than the director was, and able to see it from a different place more in line with the audience. Likewise in theatre, the performers themselves are not objective; they look to the audience to amplify or tone down parts of their performance.

I do think as fans and art fanatics, we will intially see something through the lens of our experience, and this will change over time leading to more objectivity. But the beauty of art is that it is that initial, subjective emotionally reaction that stays with you as a viewer. 

The Final Problem » "I'm not asking HOW you did it..." » January 16, 2017 12:05 pm

WhoIWantToBe
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I suppose I feel like emotion, if it was the means to get to a solution, has never really been an issue in Sherlock. I never once believed he was a sociopath or turned off emotion in favour of reason: how could he possibly be so in tune with what humans do, need and want if he were? He knows their motivations, can predict to a degree their next actions. Problem I have is he didn't really solve much in this episode, and across the whole of S4 we hear tautologisms like "I don't want to know HOW you did it", "it is what it is", that in my opinion, are lazy. It is a writer's trick to quickly dismiss having to address a matter, and state it rather as fact. 

Certainly, dialogue or the overproduction of it can come at odds with the cardinal rule of filmmaking (show, don't tell). And I suppose this is where there are faults. We were shown a lot that was never resolved, either lain as red herrings or simply disappeared from the story. Violence, grief and torture are overused in drama, and in S4 those were really the main conduits to emotion for any of the characters. The main emotional arcs of S4 are: John (and Sherlock's) grief of Mary in TST and TLD, prompting guilt and misplaced anger; John's breakdown and violence of Sherlock, indicating an emotional turning point in TLD, Sherlock's torture of himself and self-flagellation in TLD, prompting reconcillation between friends; Eurus torture/vivisection towards the trio in TFP, prompting reconcillation in the family. Anything else targeting the main arcs remains coded in subtlety and essentially invisible to the audience, and it heavily relies on stereotypical tropes to pull itself up. This is supposed to come full circle to S1, but sadly it does that more through rushed tautology near the end of TFP, and very else before. 

The narrative inconsistency, and resulting dismissal through dialogue in the script is just so hard to stomach. The message I feel I am seeing is "this is our show, we will make it the way we want to,

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